Survivable Mobile Wireless Networks: Issues, Challenges, and Research Directions

James P.G. Sterbenz, Rajesh Krishnan, Regina Rosales Hain, Alden W. Jackson, David Levin, Ram Ramanathan, and John Zao,
“Survivable Mobile Wireless Networks: Issues, Challenges, and Research Directions”,
International Conference on Mobile Computing and Networking (MobiCom),
Proceedings of the ACM Workshop on Wireless Security (WiSe 2002),
Atlanta, GA, USA, 28 September 2002, pp. 31–40.
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ABSTRACT

In this paper we survey issues and challenges in enhancing the survivability of mobile wireless networks, with particular emphasis on military requirements. Research focus on three key aspects can significantly enhance network survivability:

  1. establishing and maintaining survivable topologies that strive to keep the network connected even under attack,
  2. design for end- to-end communication in challenging environments in which the path from source to destination is not wholly available at any given instant of time,
  3. the use of technology to enhance survivability such as adaptive networks and satellites.

Categories and Subject Descriptors

C.2.1 [Computer-Communication Networks]:
Network Architecture and Design – network communications, network topology, packet-switching networks, store and forward networks, wireless communication;
C.2.2 [Computer-Communication Networks]:
Network Protocols – routing protocols;
C.4 [Computer Systems Organization]:
Performance of Systems – fault tolerance, reliability, availability, and serviceability.

General Terms

Algorithms, Design, Performance, Reliability, Security.

Keywords

Survivability, mobile wireless network, weak and episodic connectivity, disconnected, asymmetric channel, eventual stability, eventual connectivity, store and haul forwarding, low probability of detection (LPD), satellite, ad hoc routing, topology, security, fault tolerance.

Delay- and disruption-tolerant networks, DTN.

Outline

  1. INTRODUCTION TO SURVIVABILITY
    1. Definitions of Survivability
      • Information access requirements
      • End-to-end communication requirements
    2. Military network survivability
      • Transmission Security (TRANSEC)
      • Communication Security (COMSEC)
      • Authorization and Access Control
      • Network Infrastructure Protection
      • Robustness
      • Efficiency
    3. Cellular Telephone Network Survivability
    4. Ad Hoc Wireless Network Survivability
    5. Research Pursuits towards Survivability
  2. SURVIVABLE CONNECTIVITY
    1. Establishing the Network
      1. Infrastructure Assumptions
      2. Network Layer Autoconfiguration
      3. Anonymous Networks of Sensors
    2. Low Probability of Detection (LPD)
    3. Survivable Topological Connectivity
      • Power metrics
      • Connectivity constraints
      1. Energy Management
  3. SURVIVABLE COMMUNICATION
    1. Weak and Episodic Connectivity
      1. Asymetric Channel Connectivity
      2. Unstable End-to-End Paths
      3. Hierarchical and Multipath Routing
    2. Mobility
      1. Nomadicity versus Mobility
      2. Routing under very High Mobility
      3. Exploiting Mobility to Achieve Connectivity
  4. SURVIVABILITY TECHNOLOGIES
    1. Adaptive and Agile Networking
      1. Link Layer Agility
      2. Topological versus Geographical Routing
      3. Adaptive Nodes and Networks
    2. The Role of Satellites and Airborne Nodes
      1. Enhancing Connectivity
      2. Data and Control Information Dissemination
      3. Support for Radio Silence
      4. Certificate/CRL Distribution
  5. SUMMARY
  6. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
  7. REFERENCES

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©2003 James P.G. Sterbenz <jpgs@sterbenz.org>